Selected pictures/screenshots from pages of books. Credit is given to the writers and book names are included.

Selected pictures/screenshots from pages of books. Credit is given to the writers and book names are included.

 

p37

p10-11

P72

p93

p95 p103-104 p106-107 p107 p114 p115-116

…science is no synonym for spirituality, and the life of men is…

“…science is no synonym for spirituality, and the life of men is made up of more things than can be measured with test tubes and balances. Yet, man is
so absorbed in the pursuit of nature’s secrets that he is increasingly ignorant of his inner spiritual life, and this is one of the tragedies of our day. Men engaged in science are themselves partly to blame for this. They devote days and nights, months, and sometimes years, to the discovery of some scientific fact, but they will not give twenty minutes a day to pondering the Word of God, nor five minutes a day to the exercise of their soul in prayer to God…. Of course if men are going to lift such a miserable thing as humanity to a pedestal, then a holy and invisible God must be not only ignored, but despisingly rejected and hated, which is why many of our intellectual leaders today who look upon humanity as divine, must irritatingly and scornfully declare their conviction that a transcendent, omnipotent, sovereign and eternal Being can, for them, have no meaning.”

– from p.88 of “The Many Faces, and Causes, of Unbelief” by Bert Thompson, quoting Wilbur M. Smith.

The unbeliever, for reasons known only to himself…

“The unbeliever, for reasons known only to himself, either is unable, or unwilling, to concede the love of God. That—not the current evil, pain, or suffering that he currently endures— is the greatest tragedy of his life.”

– from p.105 of “The Many Faces, and Causes, of Unbelief” by Bert Thompson.

The sufferings of this earth are for real…

“The sufferings of this earth are for real. They are painful. God is deeply pained by our suffering, just as we are shocked, grieved, and mystified by the suffering of our family and friends. But that is only half of the story. The other half must be told. It is natural that our attention should be fixed on what we experience and feel here and now. But faith demands that we raise our sights and look ahead to what lies ahead. We may suffer as we journey—but where are we going? What lies ahead?”

– quoting Alister McGrath, from p.102 of “The Many Faces, and Causes, of Unbelief” by Bert Thompson.

quotes from p.90, 91 of “The Many Faces, and Causes, of Unbelief” by Bert Thompson.

” Sometimes “consensual validation” must be set aside—for the sake of truth. ” (p.90)

“Just because “hundreds of thousands of scientists” believe something does not make it right. As Darrell Huff observed: “People can be wrong in the mass, just as they can individually” (1959, p. 122). If something is true, stating it a million times does not make it any truer. Similarly, if something is false, stating it a million times does not make it true.” (p.91)

“…the idea of strict objectivity in intellectual circles is a myth. While most scholars like to think of themselves as broadminded, unprejudiced paragons of virtue, the fact is that they, too, on occasion, suffer from bouts of bias, bigotry, and presuppositionalism.” (p.91)

– quotes from p.90, 91 of “The Many Faces, and Causes, of Unbelief” by Bert Thompson.