Mark 2:16-17

Mark 2:16-17
“16) And when the scribes and Pharisees saw Him eat with publicans and sinners, they said to His disciples, ‘How is it that He eats and drinks with publicans and sinners?’
17) When Jesus heard it, He said to them, ‘They that are whole have no need of the physician, but they that are sick do: I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.”

Mark 8:34-38

Mark 8:34-38

“34) And when He had called the people to Him with His disciples also, He said to them, ‘Whosoever will come after He, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me.
35) For whosoever will save his life will lose it; but whosoever will lose his life for My sake and the Gospel’s, the same will save it.
36) For what will it profit a man, if he will gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?
37) Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?
38) Whosoever therefore will be ashamed of Me and of My words in this adulterous and sinful generation; of him also will the Son of Man be ashamed, when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels.'”

Mark 2:16-17

Mark 2:16-17
“16) And when the scribes and Pharisees saw Him eat with publicans and sinners, they said to His disciples, ‘Why is it that he eats and drinks with publicans and sinners?’
17) When Jesus heard it, He says to them, ‘They that are whole have no need of the physician, but they that are sick do: I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.'”

Did you see …

Written by Tom Graffagnino.
[re Mark 5: 1-20]

Did you see the boat approaching?
Were you with the Gadarene?
Were you with him there that morning?
Were you moved by what you’d seen?

Did you see Him from the hillside?
Did you see Him calm the squall?
Were you standing in the graveyard,
Dead and buried by the Fall?

Did the darkness there possess you?
Were you hopeless just like me?
Did you dwell among the tombstones
By the Sea of Galilee?

Did we cry out in our madness?
Were we called there to the shore?
Did the Word of Truth cut through us?
Like a sword right to the core?

Were we drawn to Him that day, sir?
Did He call us to His side?
Did the Spirit, sir, compel us?
Were we called to be His bride?

Did you hear the demons screaming
When He set you free, my friend?
Do you think He came to find us
Even as He stilled the wind?

Did He find us bruised and naked?
Did He see through our façade?
Did you recognize The Maker…
Son of man and Son of God?

* * *

“Then they came to the other side of the sea, to the country of the Gadarenes.[a] 2 And when He had come out of the boat, immediately there met Him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit, 3 who had his dwelling among the tombs; and no one could bind him,[b] not even with chains, 4 because he had often been bound with shackles and chains. And the chains had been pulled apart by him, and the shackles broken in pieces; neither could anyone tame him. 5 And always, night and day, he was in the mountains and in the tombs, crying out and cutting himself with stones.
When he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and worshiped Him….
…And when He got into the boat, he who had been demon-possessed begged Him that he might be with Him. However, Jesus did not permit him, but said to him, “Go home to your friends, and tell them what great things the Lord has done for you, and how He has had compassion on you.” And he departed and began to proclaim in Decapolis all that Jesus had done for him; and all marveled.—Mark 5: 1…20

“Study the Gospels” by J.C. Ryle.

“Study the Gospels” by J.C. Ryle

It would be well if professing Christians in modern days studied the four Gospels more than they do. No doubt all Scripture is profitable.

It is not wise to exalt one part of the Bible at the expense of another. But I think it would be good for some who are very familiar with the Epistles, if they knew a little more about Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

Now, why do I say this? I say it because I want professing Christians to know more about Christ. It is well to be acquainted with all the doctrines and principles of Christianity.

It is better to be acquainted with Christ Himself. It is well to be familiar with faith, and grace, and justification, and sanctification. They are all matters ‘pertaining to the King.’

But it is far better to be familiar with Jesus Himself, to see the King’s own face, and to behold His beauty. This is one secret of eminent holiness.

He that would be conformed to Christ’s image, and become a Christ-like man, must be constantly studying Christ Himself.

Now the Gospels were written to make us acquainted with Christ. The Holy Ghost has told us the story of His life and death,—His sayings and His doings, four times over.

Four different inspired hands have drawn the picture of the Saviour. His ways, His manners, His feelings, His wisdom, His grace, His patience, His love, His power, are graciously unfolded to us by four different witnesses.

Ought not the sheep to be familiar with the Shepherd? Ought not the patient to be familiar with the Physician?

Ought not the bride to be familiar with the Bridegroom? Ought not the sinner to be familiar with the Saviour?

Beyond doubt it ought to be so. The Gospels were written to make men familiar with Christ, and therefore I wish men to study the Gospels.

On whom must we build our souls if we would be accepted with God? We must build on the rock, Christ.

From whom must we draw that grace of the Spirit which we daily need in order to be fruitful? We must draw from the vine, Christ.

To whom must we look for sympathy when earthly friends fail us or die? We must look to our elder brother, Christ.

By whom must our prayers be presented, if they are to be heard on high? They must be presented by our advocate, Christ.

With whom do we hope to spend the thousand years of glory, and the after eternity? With the King of kings, Christ.

Surely we cannot know this Christ too well! Surely there is not a word, nor a deed, nor a day, nor a step, nor a thought in the record of His life, which ought not to be precious to us.

We should labour to be familiar with every line that is written about Jesus.