All competition is …

“All competition is in its nature only a furious plagiarism.”
– G. K. Chesterton

Advertisements

“Immanuel, God with us.” …

“”Immanuel, God with us.” It is hell’s terror. Satan trembles at the sound of it… Let him come to you suddenly, and do you but whisper that word, “God with us,” back he falls, confounded and confused… “God with us” is the laborer’s strength. How could he preach the gospel, how could he bend his knees in prayer, how could the missionary go into foreign lands, how could the martyr stand at the stake, how could the confessor own his Master, how could men labor if that one word were taken away?… “God with us” is eternity’s sonnet, heaven’s hallelujah, the shout of the glorified, the song of the redeemed, the chorus of the angels, the everlasting oratorio of the great orchestra of the sky.”
– Charles H. Spurgeon

Because we are Christians …

“Because we are Christians who believe the inspired Word of God and because we believe that the Holy Spirit is the abiding third person of the Trinity, there should be more divine authority in our preaching ministries. A preacher of this gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ should have the authority of God upon him, so that he makes the people responsible to listen to him. When they will not listen to him, they are accountable to God for turning away from the divine Word. A preacher under God’s unction should reign from his pulpit as a king from his throne. He should not reign by law or by regulation or by man’s authority. He ought to reign by moral ascendancy! The divine authority is missing from many pulpits. We have “tabby cats” with their claws carefully trimmed in the seminary, so they can paw over the congregations and never scratch them at all! The Holy Spirit will sharpen the arrows of the man of God who preaches the whole counsel of God!”

– A. W. Tozer

What short-sighted creatures we often are …

“What short-sighted creatures we often are! We think we see the end when we are only viewing the beginning. We get our telescope out sometimes to look to the future, and we breathe on the glass with the hot breath of our anxiety, and then we think we see clouds and darkness before us. If we are in trouble, we see
“Every day new straits attend,
And wonder where the scene will end.”
Nay; we conclude that it must end in our destruction. We imagine “God hath forgotten to be gracious.” We think “He hath in anger shut up the bowels of compassion.” Oh, this short-sightedness! When you and I ought to believe in God; when we ought to look at the heaven which awaiteth us, and the glory for which these light afflictions are preparing us; when we ought to be looking through the cloud to the eternal sun which never knows an eclipse; when we should be resting on the invisible arm of the immortal God, and triumphing in His love, we are mourning and distrusting. God forgive us for this, and enable us henceforth to look not ‘at’ our troubles, but ‘above’ them, even to Him who, with infinite wisdom and love, is guiding us, and has promised to bring us safely through.”

– Charles H. Spurgeon.

Christians have largely shut …

“Christians have largely shut up their spirituality into a small corner of life—Sunday church or their Bible studies—instead of realizing the lordship of Christ is to permeate the whole spectrum of life. They have coasted along complacently, often serving up such dogmas as, “You can’t mix religion and politics”, or “You can’t legislate morality”, or “We just need to pray and witness to people”—when what they really meant was, “We just don’t want to be disturbed”. They were content in their ‘comfort zone.'”
– Francis Schaeffer

Whoever is truly humbled …

“Whoever is truly humbled — will not be easily angry, nor harsh or critical of others. He will be compassionate and tender to the infirmities of his fellow-sinners, knowing that if there is a difference — it is grace alone which has made it! He knows that he has the seeds of every evil in his own heart. And under all trials and afflictions — he will look to the hand of the Lord, and lay his mouth in the dust, acknowledging that he suffers much less than his iniquities have deserved.”
– John Newton